Mithila sambat as the national sambat

November 12, 2007 at 10:47 am 4 comments

(A letter published in Kantipur)

Mithila sambat as the national sambat

— Ramnarayan Dev

In recent days, Nepal sambat has become the subject of major discussions in the ‘former’ Nepal Valley. The Newar community believes that Sankhadhar Shakhwa started had this sambat. When did he free the local people from the so-called ‘debt’? Who was ruling at that time? Nepal sambat has been popularized extensively through the folklores (among the Newari people). However, the folklores are deprived of concrete (historical) facts.

Newar community is the ‘oldest’ inhabitant of the Kathmandu valley, there is no doubt. However, the language and culture of Newar community have been ‘influenced heavily’ by the Aryan Hinduism. Newar is a Dravidian belonging to the Mongolian race. Originally, the Newars have come from a village called Nayer which is near Madras in the southern part of India.’ Newar’ has been derived from this village name – Nayer, Swoyambhulal Shrestha, a noted culture-scientist has said in his book.

According to the noted historians, South Indian king from Karnataka, Nanyadev established his kingdom in (Tirhut) Mithila. Nanyadev had come from Simauragadh in A.D.1097. The same king Nanyadev had attacked Kathmandu valley and annexed it to his large kingdom. The people who had come with the king settled down in the valley. In this way, the Newars happened to enter the Kathmandu valley.

During the rule of Lichchavis and Malla kings, Aryans arrived from India through the plains of Terai. The Hindus assimilated in the local Newari community. Even nowadays, the people who originally came from the Mithila region, like Brahmin (Jha, Mishra) and Kayastha can be easily traced in all three cities, namely Bhaktapur and Lalitpur and the surrounding areas of Hanuman-Dhoka in Kathmandu in a large number (running into thousands.) They have already assimilated into the Newari culture and tradition, and their marriage is arranged within the Newari community of the valley.

A Malla king, Jayasthiti Malla had sought help from the two Mithila scholars, Pandit Raghunath Jha and Kirtinath upadhyay to classify Newars into different 4 castes and 36 sub-castes as per the Hindu system of classification. Before Lichchhavis or Malla kings had even arrived in the Nepal valley, King and great scholar Videha Janaka’s Kushdhwaj Janaka had been ruling the valley in Tetra Yuga. Then Kathmandu was a part of the Mithila Kingdom.

Mithila, also known as Janakpur, have been the centre of ‘scholarship’ from the ancient times. King Janaka was himself a very learned philosopher. Intellectuals and scholars like Sukdev and Astabakra were present in his palace. In the Mithila kingdom, it has been recorded that many different rulers started their own version of sambat or calendars.

Sak sambat, Laxman sambat, Karnata sambat et al are few examples of some Mithila calendars. However, Mithila has its own panchhanga which is very different from the Nepali panchhanga. It is said that the Nepali panchhanga is similar to the Kashi panchhanga. Meanwhile, the Mithila panchhanga has its own originality. According to the Mithila calendar, a new year starts from the month of Shrawan and ends with Ashwin. There are many sambats in Mithila but Sak sambat is officially recognized. From the Shrawan this year, Sak sambat 1929 have started. Mithila King Janaka and Sita are recognized as the national dignitaries of Nepal.

Why shouldn’t we recognize Mithila sambat as the national sambat then?

source::http://kathmanduspeaks.blogspot.com/2007/03/mithila-sambat.html

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Articles.

A Short History of Nepal मधेशी आन्दोलनका विस्तृत अध्ययन प्रतिवेदन

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Nepalputra  |  January 7, 2008 at 4:18 pm

    Thanks a lot for your interest in Nepal Sambat. First of all, various historical facts have been published which have supported the existence of Sankhadhar Sakhwa. Please read up on the issue before commenting.

    Even if the story is just a folklore, a folklore where a person spends all his wealth for the nation and the nation commemorating it, is good enough for mainitaining the spirit of the nation. Your statement of the origin of Newar has been proved false many times. You can just have a look at an ordinary Newar to know that s/he is not a Dravidian. Its like saying Nepalese are from Naplese because the two words rhyme. Some of the Newars might have had Dravidian ancestory but it is very limited.

    By the way, what does a Dravidian belonging to Mongolian race mean? I think you yourself are not sure of what you mean. Its like saying a Negro of Caucasian race.

    The earliest Newars are the Kirats (called Nepahang) as can be stated by their physical appearance. These community mixed with the Shakyas, Brijjis, Licchivis, Mallas, Khas to create the multiethnic, multiracial, multireligious society of Newars. The Shakya, Malla, Lichhavis (by now called Jyapus), Brijjis (Sah called Salmi or Sayami now) are Aryans. Their culture is based on Vedas or Tripitaka according to their religion. So, there is no “heavy influnece” of Aryan culture but presence of Aryans themselves. You can compare this with saying that there is heavy Aryan influnece in Khas society (makes any sense at all?). Jayasthiti Malla Thakur, as he was called in his days, did bring in Brahmins from Terai. In fact, he even wrote poetery in Maithili. But the process of dividing the society into castes and hence bringing this social unjustness is all those Brahmins did. Its not an asset on their part but a liability to the society. If you read Swayambnu Puran, Pashupati puran or even Ramayana, there is no mention of Mithila kingdom extending to Kathmandu, so please spare this nonsense. Besides, a person who was asking questions about the existence of Sankhadhar Sakhwa needs to bring forward the proof of existence of Janak or Sita to show that Mithila kingdom even existed. Till date, there is no evidence.

    Now, why Nepal Sambat and not any other sambat? Well, in case you know something outside Mithila and within Nepal, you can find Kirat Sambat ( Yalambar was a real historical figure unlike myth of Janak or Sita), Buddha Sambat (Buddha had historical and scientific existence unlike Janak and Sita and this Sambat commemorating a son of Nepal is being used in Thailand, Srilanka, Burma, Laos etc amongst others), Lhosar, Hijri Sambat, Ishwi Sambat etc are also in use here.

    So, how do we select which one is good enough? Well, we need to have a sambat which at least

    1Commemorates the people of nation,
    2Is not ethnic
    3Commemorates nationalism
    4Is not religious

    Nepal Sambat has all of these qualities. It is not related to a certain ethnic group (like Mithila Sambat or Kirat Sambat). Neither is it religious (like Mithila Sambat, Ishwi Sambat). It is named after the nation (Sankhadhar Sakhwa could have named it Sakhwa Sambat). A person clearing debt, whether mythically or really does commemorate nationalism. Besides, it was used as national era till the time of Chandra Samsher who decided to remove it to import more “su-sanskrit” culture from India.

    So, I think Nepal Sambat is the best for all Nepalese people.

  • 2. Ashish  |  February 8, 2009 at 5:42 am

    It was really interesting to read your post. i am a tad bit confused about the origins of Newar. In your post you write, “Newar is a Dravidian belonging to the Mongolian race.” But doesn’t this conflict with your statement, ” Originally, the Newars have come from a village called Nayer which is near Madras in the southern part of India.”

    The only reason i am showing interests in any of the articles and posts is because of my quest to unveil the origins of Newars.

  • 3. YKS  |  July 22, 2010 at 5:19 am

    Oh, such a funny write up. Kukkur lai thaha chaina bhane na lekheko nai ramro hunthiyo. Dravidian belonging to the Mongolian hare? Ba,ke bhanna khojeko hola? jata payo, jaso payo lekhera huncha ke?
    Thanks Nepalputra for clearing the nonsense written by this nincoompoop.

  • 4. Bimal Jha  |  April 10, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    sorry ! but your self defined assumption has forced me to write this all,
    You have mentioned regarding the Maithil brahmins who now permanently have become residential of kathmandu as follow
    ” During the rule of Lichchavis and Malla kings, Aryans arrived from India through the plains of Terai. The Hindus assimilated in the local Newari community. Even nowadays, the people who originally came from the Mithila region, like Brahmin (Jha, Mishra) and Kayastha can be easily traced in all three cities, namely Bhaktapur and Lalitpur and the surrounding areas of Hanuman-Dhoka in Kathmandu in a large number (running into thousands.) They have already assimilated into the Newari culture and tradition, and their marriage is arranged within the Newari community of the valley.”
    this is a base less & totally wrong.
    The maithil brahmin from kathmandu still following their original culture, they have kept their culture and tradition still alive.
    they are as same as the maithil brahmins from terai region or mithila pradesh.
    they are not less than any of those maithil brahmins who are from mithilanchal.
    if it is not so, why the maithil brahmins from mithilanchal are in favor to agree to marry their daughters to a maithil bhraman of kathmandu?
    we never have supported to marriage relation with any other caste, yes there are some cases as but those can be taken as extra ordinary.
    we never have assimilated with Newars nor ever will.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Celebration of 1,00,000

Madhesi Voice

United We Celebrate

People Celebrating faguwa (Holi), with the fun of music, quite popular among Terai people. Holi is celebrated each year on the eve of falgun purnima Faguwa (Holi) Celebration

Past Posts

Archives

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 49 other followers


%d bloggers like this: